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  • Welcome to the RunnerDuck Blog

    We use to publish a monthly newsletter but decided to step up and do a blog instead. Just like our newsletter we will update this "newsletter" about once a month.
    Each month we bring you news from our little town of Coupeville, WA and happenings around the island we live on.
    We hope you enjoy our blog and we'd encourage you to sign up for email notification since it doesn't update all that frequently.
    Welcome
    Ken and Marilyn

Day 30 – Turning The Corner

Yesterday was another fun day visiting with Ken’s old high school friend Bill and his wife Sue. The temperature was hotter than even the previous day so they were kind enough to give us an air conditioned car tour of the Manassas area.

We started with lunch at the Red Fox Inn in Middlesburg, Virginia. The town was founded in the early 1700’s and the Red Fox Inn has been an inn and tavern since 1728.

And we thought Coupeville, where we live, was old being the second oldest town in the state of Washington established in 1853, NOT!

Here’s a shot of the outside of the building.

Inside the ceiling was low with timbers holding it up. There was a large fireplace with the iron arm to hold the cooking pot.

We had a very good lunch and it was really fun to eat in such a historic building. When we were done with lunch we briefly, due to the extreme heat, walked around town and here is the visitors center in the 1810 Pink Box Building.

At the end of that street was the Middleburg Town Office. The age of the building is unknown to us but it had to be really old.

While driving along we took this picture that’s representative of the homes in the area.

We tried to get a look at the Bull Run Battlegrounds but the traffic was so heavy that we couldn’t get close enough to a good glimpse of them. We could have walked around but in the 105 degree F heat it was just not practical. We did come across a reenactment of a Civil War camp and snapped this picture.

They are celebrating the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War so there were thousands of people packing every street and battlefield visitor center. While it would have been wonderful to be a part of this celebration the stifling heat was just too much to bear.

After some more lies were exchanged between Ken and Bill it was time to say goodbye. It was really special getting to reconnect with a very old “best friend” after so many years. Promises were made that we’ll hook up again in the not so distant future. If you have old friends that you haven’t connected with for a long time we highly recommend it before it’s too late. Ken can’t stop talking about Bill and getting to see him again. The stories and memories are worth all the gas and terrible roads we’ve traveled to get here.

Bye, Bye Bill and Sue!

One thing we found interesting in the Washington DC area, we’re only about 45 minutes from there, was our TV reception. When we set up camp we cranked up the TV antenna and started channel surfing. We discovered that of the sixteen or so channels we could get only two or three were American channels all the others were from foreign countries. No wonder the politicians have no idea of what’s going on in the United States, jezz!

When we got back to camp we saw a strange looking object out in a field. We believe we’ve got it figured out but thought we’d open it up to our readers to see what you think. What Is It???

Today we end our journey east and turn the corner to start heading west. Next stop Flatwoods KOA in Sutton, West Virginia about 255 miles away.

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7 Responses

  1. The answer to the question is: Birdhouses of some kind. Not sure what kind.
    We’re really enjoying following your trip. Feel like I should have bought stock in oil companies before you left. LOL!!!

  2. They are bird houses made from gourds. They cut the stem end off instead of boring a hole in the side.

  3. Hi Ken and Marilyn and all.
    Those look like Purple Martin Gourd Condos….Purple Martins are a blessing as they eat their weight in mosquitos… We have tried for several years to get them here at our home, but the housing has to be just right, in side and hole size and up high enough on a poll and of course a place to perch…. They are very graceful flyers too and I think pretty.
    So I guess youns are heading back West now. 30 days, gee, doesn’t seem like youns have been gone that long, but all the memories will serve you well on a cold winters night back home…
    Safe Travels and lots of Fun, just me, Betty in Va.

  4. I agree with purple martin house. We saw some at the Gourd festival in Casa Grande AZ one year.
    Loving the pictures. Travel safe.

  5. My guess is that it is a bunch of bird houses that you can raise and lower for cleaning!

  6. What a interesting town to visit. And..to see someone that you went to school with so long age. What a great thing to get to do. Sounds like you had wonderful time even tho the heat was so bad. Thank you for sharing..Enjoy!!

  7. Although I live in Eastern North Carolina, I’ve enjoyed following you website over the past three years. I wasn’t familiar with runner ducks until I found your site. Since then I’ve enjoyed the artilces written along with the woodworking plans. I’ve seen lots of those things in this part of the country. It’s quite common in some areas of NC and Virginia, and a lot of people put them up hoping to have purple martins take up residence so they’ll feast on the mosquitoes in the evenings. Hope you have a good trip in this part of the country.

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